Beverage Map Reflection

Overall, the Knowledge Map became for me, a large cluster of information separated mainly between the three appeals of logos, pathos, and ethos. The three appeals were used as a means of organizing my information. The first fold was mostly pathos, the second ethos, and the third logos.

Because I saw little use for such a physical artifact, I related the folds of information to that of a newspaper. I imagined myself in a coffee shop, reading a paper. Because of that, the folding of the artifact became a metaphor for reading a paper, therefore being immersed into the experience of a coffee shop (1st fold) without actually being present in a coffee shop.

I intended for my audience to be young college graduate professionals, which led to my third fold being about the cultural significance of beverages. I didn’t want to dumb down information and simply list what my intended audience already knew, so I gave them a different perspective of drinks.

I used information from the video project loosely, pulling from the experience of being in the coffee shop for the interview. Although much of what Mike said was interesting, I wanted to expand to other beverages.

“It was frustrating how big the scale of the project was. I personally thought the knowledge map was successful at 50% of its size. It was easy to fit in a hand folded up and expanded out to the third fold at 50%.

Next time, I would probably use a less diverse color scheme. Although I thought it was successful as a color scheme, using different colors across folds as the main colors of the backgrounds made it seem disorganized to the crits.

The crits were helpful and unhelpful at the same time. I wish we did this silent crit at mid-critique, and switched classes to see more varied perspectives. Although the crit was helpful, it would have been more helpful at an earlier stage. All in all, it was definitely a more realistic situation to not be present during the artifact viewings.”

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